Victor, Hugo and Laverne singing A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre dame picture image

Victor, Hugo and Laverne singing A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre dame

 

After the intensity of Hellfire, the movie gets a little dark. Frollo goes on a tear extorting Gypsies, arresting people, attempting to kill people including Phoebus and burning a good portion of Paris. After these scenes the movie needs some levity, after all this is a children movie. The levity we’re given is A Guy Like You. I hate this song, there I said it, I hate a Guy like you.

 

Hugo A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Hugo A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Gargoyles A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gargoyles A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Gargoyles and Quasimodo A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gargoyles and Quasimodo A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a Guy like you the gargoyles once again build Quasimodo expectations of  Esmeralda being love with him. They tell Quasimodo that since he’s special, she has to be in love with him.  What examples does the song give that  Quasimodo is special? Well he has “something more”, vague statement song. But the song is mainly focused on his looks. Sure there being positive about it but that’s all they can say about Quasimodo is that he looks special. It’s interesting, the movie’s moral is about looking beyond superficiality but this song really only talks about his looks not how amazing or kind or even talented he is.

 

Victor, Laverne and Quasimodo playing poker A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Victor, Laverne and Quasimodo playing poker A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Gargoyles and Quasimodo at the barber shop A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gargoyles and Quasimodo at the barber shop A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Gargoyles Victor, Hugo and Laverne, make an Amadeus reference Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gargoyles make an Amadeus reference Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The song has some good musicality, it’s sung well (though Jason Alexander can’t seem to pronounce Dieu), and it has some clever lyrics but it’s annoying. It tries to have that certain Disney magic but it just doesn’t. I’m little hard-press to categorize it to the Disney song scheme. I would say it’s a sidekick song but those numbers are usually fun and most of the time a show stopper.  A Guy like you stops the movie but not in a good way. After so much drama this just weak levity.

Laverne Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame image picture

Laverne Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Hugo, Victor Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Hugo, Victor Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

A Croissant A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

A Croissant A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then there is all the anachronism. I dislike the use of anachronism in this movie on the part of the gargoyles. It made sense with the Genie in Aladdin, he’s a supernatural magical entity with cosmic power. With the gargoyles they’re part of the architecture, how can know what poker is, hairspray, Mozart and grand pianos and the like. Here is a list of all the anachronism just from a A Guy like you ( if you know of more let me know, the links are pictures from the song)

Victor and Laverne singing A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre dame picture image

Victor and Laverne singing A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre dame

Victor singing A Guy Like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Victor singing A Guy Like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Hugo in drag Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Hugo in drag Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modern playing cards, there were cards but not the playing card and the card here look too modern

– Paris as the city of Love (not in 15th century),

– Accordion music is used, it’s basic form for wasn’t created till 1822

– Cigar, Hugo smokes a sausage like cigar and Laverne is smoking  cigar at the poker table, your a decade too early for that. Victor and also wear visors.

Poker wasn’t invented till 1937

Barber shop is too modern

Hair spray, 1940s

Mozart 1756-1791, I get that it’s a reference to Tom Hulce as Mozart in Amadeus.

Croissant, 19th century

Grand Piano, well the Piano concept was it until the 17th century

Laverne wears a Feather Boa, Feather Boa were documented in 1820 but they could have been wore in the 17th century but in the 1480s nope

Victor wears a bow tie, Bow ties  flourished 18th century not in the 15th

Gargoyles A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gargoyles A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Gargoyles A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gargoyles A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Gargoyles and Quasimodo A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gargoyles and Quasimodo A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seriously Disney thinks they can get alway with anachronisms when a character is magical but they can’t. The fact that you’re seeing less and less of this referential and  anachronism humor in their movies means I guess Disney learned it’s lesson but this type of humor wasn’t that funny to begin with. I’m sure the song was meant to be hilarious and/or witty but it’s neither. It’s the most light-heart song but it’s the weakest in the movie.

 

Next Time – Court of Miracles

Clopin, Phoebus,and Quasimodo Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Clopin, Phoebus,and Quasimodo Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Hellfire is Heaven’s Light’s  foil in every possible way. Heaven’s Light is a sweet hopeful ballad with some subtle humor in the visualization but Hellfire is an intense villain song that has a breaks down into insanity.

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Esmeralda as a fire demon dancing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Damee picture image

Esmeralda as a fire demon dancing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hellfire is a villain song, but it’s not just any villain song, it’s “THE” villain song. Many people consider it the best and one of the darkest  Disney villain songs. So what makes this song so good and dark?

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Esmeralda as a fire demon dancing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Damepicture image

Esmeralda as a fire demon dancing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

The song starts with Frollo singing to Notre Dame both  figuratively and actually ( The building and the Virgin). He claims that he’s purer than the common people and still as pure as he is, he can’t understand his obsession for Esmeralda and why she is invading his mind. For Frollo this lust is not in conflict with ethics or his own deep religious convictions; it’s all about pride and fearing losing control within himself.  You can see him visually losing of control: he starts calm and become more and more crazy  as the song progresses.

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Frollo there are two ways to resolve his problem, either Esmerlada must die or she must be his. Hellfire has a very similar vibe to Frollo in the book. Victor Hugo’s Frollo was very proud of his purity. But much like Disney Frollo Hugo’s Frollo felt that Esmeralda was sent by hell to take him away. Unlike Disney Frollo, Hugo’s Frollo is more of a stalker who is hopelessly seeking out Esmeralda. He doesn’t really want her to die but doesn’t want her to be with anyway else. Disney’s Frollo is more black and white, either she is his or she dies, he only going to ask once.  Frollo in Hellfire does have a twinge of gray (which you’ll never seen again), he asks for God to have mercy on both him and Esmeralda. If as he knows he’s wrong but he won’t do anything about it because he too far gone. The Latin chanted “Mea Culpa” (Through my fault) also drives that point too.

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame pitcure image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo and an illusion of Esmeralda during Hellfire

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s an odd Disney Villain song as Frollo isn’t revealing in his evilness or what his brilliant evil plans are, he is simply singing out his desperation which ultimately gets worse. Unlike other songs, Frollo is not singing to anyone, usually a villain is rubbing something in the hero’s face, being a demagogue, or exposing their master plan of evil to minions. Frollo is singing to himself. It reminds me of La Monture. In the original staging in Notre Dame de Paris, where Fleur de Lys (Phoebus’ fiancee) is singing about her desperation for Esmeralda to be hanged. In the original staging, she singing to her shadow. In singing alone Frollo’s feelings come off more intense, power, and frantic while he sings to the fireplace while seeing illusions and the becomes engulfed in specters.

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

The song is perfectly sung by Tony Jay, he showcases control and then goes intense. The Latin chanting  is  great mood enhancer. The music is intense and the Hellfire melody makes up a lot of the Hunchback of Notre Dame’s score. The Music was inspired by Mozart’s Requiem Mass which completes the dark presentation of the song.

Frollo at the end Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo at the end Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

The music, the singing, the lyrics, and visuals  with the intensity, insanity, sexuality, and  religious overtones  create a great piece of moviedom.  I wish Disney would explore their darker side more, because when they do it’s better than some of their more saccharine fair. I mean Disney enjoys going dark, it’s part of their history (Night of Bald Mountain). So Disney embrace the darkness more often! Please…

 

Next Time- A Guy Like you

Victor, Hugo and Laverne singing A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre dame picture image

Victor, Hugo and Laverne singing A Guy like you Disney Hunchback of Notre dame

Quasimodo's figurines from "Heaven's Light" Hunchback of Notre Dame Disney picture image

Quasimodo's figurines from "Heaven's Light"

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo and an illusion of Esmeralda during Hellfire

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heaven’s Light and Hellfire are meant to be listened together. Both parts represent the basic nature of The Hunchback of Notre Dame; how feelings can be internalized and twisted according to the individual. However I’m going to look at Heaven’s Light and Hellfire separately, because of the intensity of Hellfire and the simplicity of Heaven’s Light.

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heaven’s Light is the second ballad in the film and is Quasimodo’s final song though it is reprise later in the movie. It’s the only romantic song to make into movie. In this song Quasimodo  equivalents love to being heavenly. Since Quasimodo believes himself to be hideous, he thinks he not meant for love. However since Esmeralda gave him a peak on the cheek without fear, he calls her an angel and he’s hopeful that she could love him. This hopefulness is gestalt of song.

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is lot going on in this song: Quasimodo explains what love is like, he feel he’s not meant for it but then not a beat goes by and he turns his hopeful-o-meter up to max, as he hopes that Esmeralda could love him because she wasn’t afraid of him. The song seems to do a lot. This is because it’s such a short song and that’s it feels kind of ADD. Quasimodo goes from being emo to sappy.  Anarkia in Notre Dame de Paris has a similar ADD feel to it.

Victor and Laverne's drawing of Esmeralda Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Victor and Laverne's drawing of Esmeralda Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Hugo draws Djali Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Hugo draws Djali Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The elements of humor in this song by the gargoyles are actually good. It’s relevant and cute to the song. In the song each gargoyle draws a picture. The pictures reflect their personalities, Laverne and Victor draw Esmeralda and Hugo draws Djali. It’s cute relevant humor. I like  Victor’s drawing the best.

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have to admit that for me this song gets a little lost because it’s the song that comes right before Hellfire, which is for many people is their favorite song in the film and their favorite villain. However listening to the song in isolation, it’s a sweet, well done song that develops Quaismodo’s character as both hopeful and naive.

Quasimodo reprise Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo reprise Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Phoebus and Esmeralda Kiss Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Phoebus and Esmeralda Kiss Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo reprise Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo reprise Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Later when the song is reprised it’s a bittersweet sting to Quaismodo as his heart breaks as he watches Esmeralda and Phoebus kiss.

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo singing Heaven's Light Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

All in all it’s a good song, not terrible but not not fanatic. It’s one flaw is being next to Hellfire.

Next Time – Hellfire.

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame Hellfire Disney picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

God Help The Outcasts is a very different Disney heroine song. Many of the Female Disney Characters sing about wanting something for themselves. While Esmeralda is singing about wanting something that is not for her. She is being  selfless which furthers elevates her into the mature sector.

 

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

The song is simple, it’s Esmeralda praying for the welfare of her people. This humble and selfless prayer is shown in contrast to the other parishioners who pray for selfish things like wealth, fame and love. This scene is pretty much lifted from the 1939 version albeit with some differences but the overall scene and content is the same.

 

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcast Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcast Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

Unlike in the 1939 version, during the course of the song Esmeralda walks through the sanctuary of Notre Dame. It’s the only time in the Hunchback of Notre Dame where we get to see the interior of  Notre Dame other than the bell tower. While it’s nice to see the sanctuary portion of Notre Dame there are more than a few things wrong with how Notre Dame is presented. I’ll go more in depth on that later for now let’s get into the reviewing the  song’s content.

Esmeralda Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame singing "God Help the Outcast" picture image

Esmeralda singing “God Help the Outcast” Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

The song musically is nice and is pleasant. It’s one of two ballads that made it into the film. It’s the prettiest song in the movie and it’s sung well by Heidi Mollenhauer. However there is an air of  condescension with this song. As Esmeralda is trying to sound humble she is saying some really condescending lines. She asks for nothing because she is lucky and better off then most of her people and if God doesn’t help no one will help them.  She also reminds Gods that everyone is “children of God” and that Mary should relate to her because she thinks Mary was once an outcast like her. This another fault with the song, she’s in Notre Dame de Paris, in any Notre Dame, Mary is the figure of reverence. However she starts praying to Mary and then instantly switchs to God. Maybe it’s her “outcast” “pagan” ways that she would do this flippantly  but my guess is God is more dramatic and fits song meters better,  Even though Mary embodies compassion. Then again Frollo prays to Mary to burn Esmeralda, so what is the movie trying to say about Mary? I mean everyone seems to be trying to get out of Notre Dame.

 

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

There is also all her “I” statements that are kind of off putting. Her lines are “I ask for nothing, I can get by, but I know so many less lucky than I”  these lyrics just seem to reek with “I’m better than you” mentality.

Esmeralda looking at the Virgin Mary Maureen O'Hara 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda looking at the Virgin Mary, Maureen O’Hara 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

In the  spectrum of the “Esmeralda’s Prayer”  which isn’t in the book,  God Help the Outcast is the worst. Beside this song there are two other prayers, the fore-mention 1939 version  and Ave Maria Paien from Notre Dame de Paris. In the 1939 version, Esmeralda (Maureen O’Hara) asks “The mother of God” to help her people, she says that Mary can take all that she has but Esmeralda presents Mary with a Method; she asks to speak to the King as he is a authority figure and can help her and her people, which he does as the end.  In the 1939 version, Esmeralda  is sincere and humble, and as she not insulting anyone by saying she’s better off. In Ave Maria Paien (The Pagan Ave Maria) Esmeralda is (pending on which version your listening to) asking for a few things, protection from the fools who are in control and the joining of all people. The essence of the song is she wants Ave Maria on her side. Is it humble and selfless?  Not really, she does come off as humble and sincere though. Disney Esmeralda is sincere but she seems to have a defeatist attitude, only god can help and no one else can, she’s powerless to do anything.  Maybe Esmeralda should have ask God to make Frollo tolerant. At least that would have been proactive.

 

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda singing God Help the Outcasts Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

The problem with God Help the Outcasts isn’t the music or the singing, it’s the content. While it’s great that Esmeralda is mature and is capable of praying selflessly but in the course of the song she’s pretty much insulting her people, and due to juxtaposition of the her prayer with other parishioners she is making them look bad. So she can’t be selfless and humble without bring others down?

Next Song – Heaven’s Light (I have a little bit  more on God Help the Cast, so stay tuned)

Quasimodo's figurines from "Heaven's Light" Hunchback of Notre Dame Disney picture image

Quasimodo’s figurines from “Heaven’s Light”

Topsy Turvy follows in the path of the big show stopping music numbers of Disney. Other songs like this included (but not limited to) Under the Sea (The Little Mermaid), Be Our Guest (Beauty and the Beast) and A Friend Like Me ( Aladdin). Unlike these, Topsy Turvy is not a show stopper, it doesn’t stop the movie for the sake of a spectacle, but instead  Topsy Turvy propels the plot forward.

 

Clopin during the Feast of Fools Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Clopin during the Feast of Fools Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

There is a lot that happens within the course of the song with regards to story telling. The festive starts and Quasimodo gets caught in the swing of it, Quasimodo meets Esmeralda, Esmeralda dances getting the attention of Quasimodo, Phoebus and Frollo, the King of Fools contest starts, and Quasimodo is crown the king.  There so much that happens that the song is broken up into four part essentually. These parts are well connected and the last portation with Quasimodo as the King of Fools features a keynote change to denote the ending of the song.

Clopin Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback Notre Dame picture image

Clopin Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback Notre Dame

Quasimodo Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Disney Esmeralda Hunchback of Notre Dame Dance picture image

Esmeralda's Dance Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

As far as the song is concerned it’s fun. It’s very celbratory, the lyrics are clever and Paul Kandel does well singing it. It’s the only Disney song to use a word meaning prostitutes. The line “Join the bums and theives and strumpets,” a strumpets is an old fashion word for a prostitute or a harlot. Kind of intresting that the only Dinsey song to use a word for prostitute would also feature a pole dance.

 

Reversal Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Reversal Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo reacting to the craziness Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo reacting to the craziness Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Topsy Turvy CG Crowd Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Topsy Turvy CG Crowd Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The visuals help make this song memorable. There lots of  reversals to help keep the momentum going and the fun up. This visually also give Quasimodo something to react to and since he is seeing all this craziness for the first time, Quasimodo acts as the audience in this song.  There is a cast of thousand. The crowds were made using CG and at the time were a feat but the crowd in movie hasn’t aged well.

 

Clopin Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback Notre Dame image picture

Clopin Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback Notre Dame

The song has several reference that harken back to Victor Hugo’s Novel. First the lyrics mention the date a being January 6, which is the day the Feast of Fools took place on. Of course the movie doesn’t seem to take place in winter, then again it could just be unseasonably warm.

 

 

 

Disney Esmeralda Hunchback of Notre Dame Dance picture Image

Esmeralda's Dance Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

Another Reference is Clopin referring to Esmeralda as “La Esmeralda”. Esmeralda in the book is very often referenced to with the article “La.”

 

 

 

 

Shock the Priest Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Shock the Priest Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

The last reference and probably the most interesting. Is on the line “shock the priest” Clopin is holding a Frollo puppet. This is a clear reference to Frollo being a priest in the book.

 

 

 

Quasimodo as the King of Fools Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo as the King of Fools Topsy Turvy Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

The song itself is fine, it big and fun but it’s not my favorite. I would position this song in the middle of the ranking  however I can understand why many would like it, it’s a fun song that adds to the movie and alludes to the book very appropriately.

 

Next Song – God Help the Outcast

Esmeralda Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame singing "God Help the Outcast" picture image

Esmeralda singing "God Help the Outcast" Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

http://youtu.be/7DCALg2levk

Frollo and Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo and Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo and Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo and Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out There is for all intended purposes is a solo but its prelude is duet between Frollo and Quasimodo. Frollo sings about how awful the world is as a means for controlling Quasimodo. When Frollo departs the scene, the mood of the song changes into  Quasimodo singing about a yearning to venture beyond the tower and go flocking with the normal people.

 

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Ariel Disney The Little Mermaid picture image

Ariel Disney The Little Mermaid

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is no good way to say it, Out There is a knock off of “Part of your World” from the Little Mermaid.  Lots of Disney characters sing this “wanting more” type of song but Out There and Part of that World express the some thought. And it’s interesting that they both point to a direction; up for Ariel and down for Quasimodo and they both mention a desire for the sun and to be with “the people”. They also kind of look alike, red hair and they both wear green.

 

 

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

So how is the song on a music level? Got say, the song it’s self is pretty typical Disney fare. It’s one of the typical songs you’ll hear in a Disney movie, the dreamer’s song. It’s usually the main character singing about wanting something more. This song is just Quasimodo singing about even if just one day he wants to apart of the people. The music is fine, it’s nice and symphomatic. The lyrics are very repetitive: he wants to be to live a day with the regular people, I get. Quasimodo does come off naive to think that just because people live “out there” this qualifies them as normal and he also insinuates that it’s a gift for them to be normal despite the whole issue with gypsies who have to live in catacombs to avoid Frollo’s genocide tendencies.

 

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

The singing is where this song fails for me. Hulce’s vibrato  has too much of a wobble for me. I think this fast vibrato is meant to give Quasimodo an innocence and naivety but it too much wobble. The wobbly vibrato ruins Hulce’s performance for me and do think he a decent enough singer otherwise.

 

 

 

 

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo singing "Out There" Hunchback of Notre Dame Disney picture image

Quasimodo singing "Out There" Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

The best part of the song in the movie is the visuals. I remember the first time I saw it, the part where Quasimodo slid down the buttress was my favorite visual, I thought it looked fun, of course as a kid I thought it was a water slide and not a support structure.  I really enjoy Quasimodo interacting with the Notre Dame, he may be dreaming on being on terra firma but Notre Dame is like his private playground.

 

Belle, Carpet, Pumbaa Disney Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, Lion King

Belle, Carpet, and Pumbaa

Frollo in the Square during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo in the Square during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Satellite Dish during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Satellite Dish during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a few things that appear in the song that many viewers don’t seem to notice. The first are cameos, which people do notice. The Cameos are Belle (Beauty and the Beast), Pumba (The Lion King) and Carpet (Aladdin). Two other things, is Frollo can be seen in the square as Quasimodo is looking down and a satillite dish can be seen on a house in the bird’s view of Paris or La Cite in this case.

 

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo during Out There Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

So the song is by no means in the top tier of the songs in The Hunchback of Notre Dame, it by no means is it the worst. It’s just a VERY typical formulaic Disney song.

 

Next Time –Topsy Turvy

Clopin during the Feast of Fools Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Clopin during the Feast of Fools Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

Clopin Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Clopin with puppet during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

The Bells of Notre Dame is the opening to the movie. Click Here to get The Bells Of Notre Dame

http://youtu.be/Tv4W0VkoUfM

The Opening Shot of  Disney's Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

The Opening Shot of Disney's Hunchback of Notre Dame

Paris Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame  picture image

Paris during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Clopin Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Clopin during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bells of Notre Dame starts off like The 1939  version, very appropriately with Bells  and Latin choir  (unlike the 1939 version). The bells grow in intensity till the title screen goes away and the opening scene starts and  the melody of the  refrain from Hellfire is heard. From this you get a major sense of drama before you see a single person. Then tone turns gentle and quite, then intense, then more intense. This song is like a roller coaster.

 

Clopin with Puppet bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Clopin with Puppet during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo's Mother Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo's Mother Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bells of Notre Dame does a few things for the movie, it introduces three main character, showcases Notre Dame’s importance as the setting of the film and explains the relationship between Quasimodo and Frollo. Disney had a bit of the problem with nature of Victor Hugo’s Hunchback of Notre Dame, Frollo isn’t the colossal jerk he is in the Book. He takes Quasimodo in after being moved by empathy for him, not by getting scared by a Statue and the Archdeacon because he murder an innocent women in front of the most important spiritual centers in France and fears hell that takes the baby of his victim as an act of contrition. But Disney villains are never ones for charitable act so Frollo is co-forced into  looking after Quasimodo. The Bells of Notre Dame also presents the viewers with the moral of the story, “what makes a monster and what makes a man”.

 

Frollo chases Quasimodo's mother during The Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo chases Quasimodo's mother during The Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo's Mother Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo's Mother Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

The Murder of Quasimodo's Mother Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

The Murder of Quasimodo's Mother Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Song also sets up the tone of the movie. Disney boosts that Hunchback is their darkest film, and yes it is, but it is after all a Disney film and there is a lot of “humor” in it. The Bells of Notre Dame present both facets, the humor, light-hearted Disney Flair and the darker aspects. The dark aspect are easy to see, the backstory, Frollo kills a women, tries to kill a baby and saddled into raising it. The humor comes from Clopin regaling the children with his puppet (love the Clopin Puppet). But even Clopin here is delighting in the dark dramatics of the story.

 

Frollo Hunchback of Notre Dame seeing Quasimodo for the 1st time Disney picture image

Frollo seeing Quasimodo for the 1st time Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

The Well Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

The Well Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Archdeacon Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Archdeacon Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

But is the song itself successful? Yes, yes it. I would so that it’s one of the best song in the movie right up there with Hellfire. It’s dramatic,  epic, and grand. Unlike Hellfire which has a benefits of being more  focused, Bells of Notre Dame has to fulfill it’s purpose and  has a lot of ground to cover musically. It’s starts with a Latin choir, goes into a more gentle tone and the gets  darker as the Gypsies are introduced along with Frollo, The Choir returns but more intense as Frollo  chases Quasimodo’s mother. There are so many vignettes in this song that it could have been a mess but it’s handle musically very well and the music intensifies the dramatics of the action.

Frollo in fear for his soul Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo in fear for his soul during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Notre Dame Sees all Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Notre Dame Sees all Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo and Baby Quasimodo bells Disney Hunch back of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo and Baby Quasimodo during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunch back of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally this wasn’t even going to be a song, it was going to be spoken dialogue. I’m glad they made it into a song because it’s one of the better songs in the movie. It was the perfect way for the movie to start. Your given a tone, setting, characters, motivation, drama, and some light humor. I would say it’s one the best Disney’s openings. Seriously, Clopin’s crescendo at the end is amazing, it’s probably the single greatest bit of singing in the movie, maybe even Disney History.

Clopin Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Clopin during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

A Puppet of Quasimodo bells Disney Hunchback of notre dame picture image

A Puppet of Quasimodo during the Bells of Notre Dame Disney Hunchback of notre dame

Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Bells Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Time – Part of that World,  oh wait, I mean Out There.

Quasimodo singing "Out There" Hunchback of Notre Dame Disney picture image

Quasimodo singing "Out There" Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame