Lon Chaney as Quasimodo 1923 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lon Chaney as Quasimodo 1923 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Short answer, yes! As of now there have been two Hunchback movies that seemingly have never got their footing one being from Max Ryan that had a full cast list and the other was from Josh Brolin who just had the director attached. The real question is why should they make a new version?

Salma Hayek as Esmeralda & Mandy Patinkin as Quasimodo, 1997 The Hunchback picture image

Salma Hayek as Esmeralda & Mandy Patinkin as Quasimodo,

Hollywood technically hasn’t made a Hunchback movie since 1939. Disney of course made their version 1996, but Disney is a little separate from Hollywood. The other versions were from France, (1956, and 1999) and the other versions were TV movies (1977, 1982, and 1997.) So there has not been a designated Hollywood Hunchback in  nearly 80 years.

Quasimodo (Charles Laughton) alone at the end 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Quasimodo Charles Laughton, 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame

So yeah there should a new adaptation for a more modern audience. But more than that, there are more reasons than just timeframe.  Pending on the type of the movie that the producers go for, Hunchback could be pure oscar bait. For instant it’s historical-based story with a high  pretension factor. Second make-up, one can get crazy with the Quasimodo’s make-up and people love the trope of the ugly dude with the beautiful soul and I think people on the internet eat that shit up. There also the real-life angle they could make with the Hunchback worker. Oscars LOVE movies based on true stories.

Esmeralda (Gina Lollobrigida) dances, 1956 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda (Gina Lollobrigida) dances, 1956 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Also adding to the oscar bait factor, the academy loves itself and since it made up of mostly of actors they like movies about actors. Now there isn’t actors so much in Hunchback but Gringoire is a playwright and Esmeralda is a dancer so they are technically part of the larger industry.

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

They could also go other genre routes, like re-working the story to be like a super-hero movie. Super-hero movies are super popular though they have been waning in recent years. But Quasimodo fits a super-hero type, so it could work.

Esmeralda, Phoebus and Quaismodo Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda, Phoebus and Quaismodo Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

There is also the chance, albeit not a super strong one, of Disney doing a live-action adaptation of the Disney version.  This seems to a major trend with Disney right now.  I could see this happening more than an super-hero version or a pure oscar bait.

Josh Brolin Interview for Men in Black picture image

Josh Brolin Interview for Men in Black

I will say that I have no idea what Brolin version was trying to do but I would say given Brolin and the director it might have been a super-hero variety.  I couldn’t even guess on Max Ryan’s version.

But yeah, Hollywood make a new version. What kind of Hunchback version would you like to see?

(Post Script – Max’s Ryan’s movie is a going ahead as well as an  Esmeralda movie in the works)

 

Book 9, Chapter 4, Earthenware and Crystal

Esmeralda Maureen O'Hara 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda Maureen O’Hara 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame

This chapter features a lot more interactions between Esmeralda and Quasimodo. He gives her a caged bird. One important interaction is Quasimodo tries to get Phoebus to come to Notre Dame to see Esmeralda. Poor Quasimodo waits around till 1am as Phoebus is at a pre-wedding party. Phoebus also doesn’t come because he believes Esmeralda to be dead. Quasimodo failing this task cause him to limit his interactions with Esmeralda. He then tries to convince her that his love for her is better than her dreams of Phoebus. He does this by singing to her and with a visual of two vases, one beautiful crystal that is cracked so the flowers are withered and one earthenware which is course and common but it retains the water leaving beautiful flowers. Esmeralda choices the wither flower from the crystal vase. You don’t have to be an English major to get the imaginary of the vase, Phoebus is the Crystal and Quasimodo is the earthenware. After that Quasimodo doesn’t interact with Esmeralda directly which is okay with but he sleeps outside her cell.

This chapter has been done in parts in movies, mainly in the Quasimodo getting Phoebus for Esmeralda. Sometimes he offers to get him like in the book and sometimes Esmeralda makes him go. The caged bird is seen sometimes. He also tries to tell Esmeralda that he loves her but can’t. This chapter also gives use the famous “ Oh, why am I not made of stone, like you.” Which is said to a grotesque image carved on a wall and not a gargoyle. I suppose gargoyles are more dramatic for a movie.

No movie that I know has done the vases. This because it relies on Esmeralda being shallow and naive and the movie versions at this point grow her up where she accepts Quasimodo as at least a friend.

All in all, it’s a good interesting chapter.

Book 9, Chapter 5, The Key to the Porte-Rouge

 

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris

This chapter is Frollo learning that both Esmeralda and Phoebus are alive and thus is torment begins anew. He spends his time locked away and realizes he is jealous of Quasimodo. Then one night he can’t take his lust any more he head over to where Esmeralda is.

This is never done in the movie versions. If Frollo goes to Esmeralda it’s less pre-mediated or we just never see as Frollo isn’t the focus.

 

 

Book 9, Chapter 6, The Key to the Porte-Rouge (continued)

 

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

In this chapter Frollo tires to force himself on Esmeralda. Esmeralda is saved when she find the whistle that Quasimodo left her in chapter 3 of book 9, Deaf. Quasimodo attack Frollo but when he sees it’s Frollo he tells Frollo to kill him with the knife but Esmeralda grabs it first. Frollo isn’t too happy now.

You do sometimes see this scene in the movie, like in 1923, 1956, 1977, and the1982. It seldom ever played out perfect though I think the 1977 version is the closest.

In the realm of Hunchback we know that Quasimodo will (or should) be ugly and deformed and Esmeralda should be pretty, these are truth in in the novel, they have set looks. Frollo, while he does have a set look in the novel and is supposed to have an austere harsh look gets a wide variety of looks in the movies.   So today we’re are going to look at some Frollo’s various hair styles.

Frollo’s hair in the book is balding. he had tuff of ugly gray hair on the side which give him a natural tonsure. Movie never go for this look

Jehan 1923 Hunchback of Notre Dame Brandon Hurst picture image

Jehan 1923 Hunchback of Notre Dame Brandon Hurst

In the 1923 we have two Frollo, Pious Claude and Jerk Jehan. Jehan has black hair that  goes to ears and he also seen wearing a bowler-like hat. Claude has  sepia color. He has a receding hair line.

 

Jehan Frollo (Sir Cedric Hardwicke) 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Jehan Frollo, Sir Cedric Hardwicke 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame

In the 1939 version we again have Pious Claude and Jerk Jehan. Jehan has black hair that is a straight cut across his forehead. He has lock that curl on the side his face. Claude has white hair and he wears a bishop hat.

 

Frollo (Alain Cuny), 1956 The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo (Alain Cuny), 1956 The Hunchback of Notre Dame

In the 1956 version, Frollo has a full-head of brown hair. He keeps it short.

 

Kenneth Haigh as Frollo 1977 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Kenneth Haigh as Frollo 1977 Hunchback of Notre Dame

In the 1977, Frollo has the brown hair with a straight bang line.

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

In the 1982, Frollo hair at is at it’s most stupid. It’s a blond bowl cut.

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

In the Disney version, Frollo has the same cut of 1939 Jehan but with gray hair. His bangs cut straight along the center of his forehead and then it recedes.

 

Richard Harris as Frollo, 1997 The Hunchback picture image

Richard Harris as Frollo

In the 1997, he is bald.

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris picture  image

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris

 

In original Notre Dame de Paris version, he has very short brown hair.

 

Richard Berry as Frollo 1999 Quasimodo d'El Paris picture image

Richard Berry as Frollo 1999 Quasimodo d’el Paris

In the 1999  parody version, Quasimodo d’El Paris, he has short black hair with long thin sideburns.

 

Frollo’s look in the movies (and musicals) are very different than the novel but they seem based Frollo’s look on the past movies than on the novel.

 

 

Madeline, Courage's Quasimodo, 1982, Wishbone and  1956 , Hunchback, new Year2104

All the Hunchback Versions that have been reviewed this past year!

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

There are two types of Hunchback movies; the ones that are well done but do not even pretend to follow the book and there are the types that follow the book but lack any sense of effort by the cast and the crew. The 1982 version however falls in between these types. It has a lot of weird flaws and does commit a major sin where Esmeralda is concerned but it feels like a genuine effort was put into this version.

So is the 1982 version good, adequate, or awful? I would venture to say it’s good, it’s not as great as it could have been but considering some of the other versions that exist this one is one of the better versions.

Next Hunchback version – I haven’t decided yet ^^”

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

One of the Hallmarks of any Hunchback adaptation is Notre Dame and since Notre Dame falls into the set category this makes the sets important to the movie. At least the sets should be important to the film but in the case of the 1982 version they are not. The sets in the movie are not showcased and this makes them look uninteresting and not memorable.

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

The film does not waste a single shot to establish anything, not even Notre Dame. We only get a few shots of parts of the Cathedral, mainly the door and the gallery. The reason for that that might be the didn’t really have a full scale set of the facade or a even model. They just had a set of the door up to the row statues and the upper galley where Esmeralda and Quasimodo look down on Paris. The most they seem to have of the facade is probably a matte painting.

Interior Set of the Bell tower, 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Interior Set of the Bell tower, 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Other than that the interiors sets of Notre Dame are very dark and seem imposing which goes against the ideology of Gothic Architecture of letting the light into the interior. Though we don’t get many shot of Notre Dame’s Sanctuary. However most of the sets are dark in the movie which doesn’t help them to stand out to the viewer.

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Sets of the 1982 Version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

But are the sets bad? No, they are not when you actually look at them. They look like are they are nicely made and have good aging to them. The problem is the film doesn’t care about the sets so the viewers can’t care about them, not even Notre Dame. Which is unfortunate because they are actually decent sets.

Next 1982 Article…………..

Like so many other movies, The 1982 adaption of the Hunchback is influenced by its times, in this case the infamous early 1980s. The costumes themselves are not super 80s looking, I mean when you think about the 80’s these costumes could have been so much more crazy. The costumes were design by Phyllis Dalton who designed the costumes for another little known 1980s medieval fantasy movie, I dunno maybe you have heard of it; The Princess Bride.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Esmeralda gets two costumes, which look very similar. The first one is a blue corset that has sleeves and a leaf-y gold pattern and a blue skirt with a green under skirt. The second is a pink cinch corset so her chemise is more part of the look.It also has a matching pink skirt.

Overall these two costumse don’t scream “I’M THE 80’s” but nor do they suggest a poor Gyspy girl. The fabric appears to be some form of satin. Satin did exist in the middle ages but it was very expensive. Now it’s very possible it was gifted to her but the costumes are too pristine looking.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture iamge

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

The pink is an interesting color choice. Pink is a lighter tone for red and red is Esmeralda’s default color for films. But the choice of pink keeps her young and feminine looking and works against her becoming over-sexualized. That being said, Esmeralda’s costumes are not anything special, they’re pretty sedate and boring.

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Now the part everyone cares about; Quasimdo’s make-up! How does this version measure up to Laughton’s and Chaney’s looks? It measures up fairly well. Hopkins’s looks like Laughton’s Quasimodo. He’s got the protrusion, the one good eye, the ugly teeth and rounded nose. It’s a good interpretation of Quasimodo and Laughton’s look.

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

So what part of the costumes scream the 1980’s? The Hair! Oh, the hair in this, it’s totally the 80’s. Let‘ s start with Esmeralda. Esmeralda has big curly hair but a little more than that it’s layered to have more volume near her face.

And Quasimodo has a mullet, which heyday was the 80s’. The hair is where all the 80 glory lives.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

On the whole the costumes are average at best. There is nothing remarkable or memorable but the hair is a shining example of 80’s-ness.

Next 1982 article sets.

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Clopin in the 1982 version is a lot more ruthless, cut-throat, and practical than he is other versions.

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

He has no sense of merriment to him. Instead he is all about getting money by stealing methods and using his authority as king. He uses Esmeralda as distraction to steal and for all intended purposes threatens her when she refuses to dance. He also doesn’t like being question at all by anyone.

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

He has a protective streak in a practical way in that he wants to secure the longevity of the people of the Court of Miracles. He doesn’t want to save Esmeralda from Notre Dame at first because Esmeralda is protected there and fed so he counts her lucky. He does want to save when she being threaten from the suspension of sanctuary.

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

He does all the usual Clopin tasks but he’s pragmatic and very joy-less in way he conduces himself.

Next 1982 article costumes

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Phoebus in the 1982 version is a straight-up jerk face. Which makes him a whole new depiction as there is NOTHING redeemable about him, NOTHING!

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

First off, Phoebus in the novel is a handsome womanizer but is this movie his is just a womanizer. He is not very attractive and he seems old for the role.

 Robert Powell as Phoebus & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Robert Powell as Phoebus & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

So as was mention before Phoebus is a jerk with no redeeming quality. He first meets Esmeralda and woos her and as soon as he gets in the room he starts acting stand-off and doesn’t really try to continue the seduction. Then the ball drops, Phoebus in this version is married. Upon hearing this Esmeralda leaves and then Phoebus, who is unremorseful, berates her. So when he gets stabs she is leaving anyway but the catharsis is there.

Phoebus getting stab,  1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Phoebus getting stab, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Of course the joy of his stabbing is short lived as he lives and his near death experience doesn’t make him a better like in the book. As he is recovering he is still a big jerk as he believe Esmeralda should die as she tried to kill him, of course he is looking at her when Frollo stabs him so we can add idiot to his personality.

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

He’s just a jerk with no personality or likability. He also has stupid hat.

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Next 1982 Article; Clopin

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame oicture image

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Essentially, the 1982 Gringoire function the same of he does in the 1939 movie as the lovestruck poet who falls in love with Esmeralda and is desperate to save her. However the 1982 Gringoire employs different means than his 1939 counterpart to save her. The 1982 Gringoire doesn’t use words and the printing press to save Esmeralda. Instead he uses a speech. He also suggests to Frollo that he could switch places with Esmeralda and that he will be willing to die in her place. This was in the book except it was Frollo that suggested the idea and Gringoire rejected it.

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire & Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire & Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

The 1982 Gringoire has some new facets to the characters. First we see Gringoire trying to sell some sonnets. I think this is the first and only time we see him doing this. he also is the only Gringoire to write a poem for Esmeralda. He is also the first and only Gringoire to get very jealous at Esmeralda’s adoration for Phoebus.

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

Aside from these instances of character the 82 Gringoire is very much like 1939 version. However, the 1982 version of Gringoire feels more like a real person. The 1939 version was a bit too nice and perfect. He doesn’t seem as in control the same way as the1939 version. This one gets jealous and petty in regards to Phoebus and his utter desperation to save Esmeralda while really expecting nothing makes him compelling.

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Is it the 1982 version of Gringoire greatest bestest Gringoire ever? No but it’s not an offensive depiction and it’s solid which consider most adaptation of the story is a very good thing (having flashbacks to Enchanted Tales version of Gringoire).

Next 1982 version Article; Jerky Jerk Phoebus

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Robert Powell as Phoebus, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame