When I was making a page on Frollos of Notre Dame de Paris (which I probably needs to updated or something), I was struck with how young the Italian cast was skewing on their casting for Frollo.

Vincenzo Nizzardo as Frollo  10th anniversary cast of the Italian Notre Dame de Paris picture image

Vincenzo Nizzardo as Frollo

For the 10th anniversary cast of the Italian Notre Dame de Paris, Vicenzo Nizzardo was casted and at the time he was roughly 25, so he is a good solid ten years younger than book Frollo. At the time was I off-put by this choice towards a younger Frollo but recently I have asked myself, Can we have a young Frollo?

Lemud Illustration of Frollo picture image

Lemud Illustration of Frollo

Frollo in the book is in his mid 30’s which for the 1400’s is considered old but more than that, he looks old. If I remember the book correctly, Frollo always looked older even when he in the height of youth.

Richard Harris as Frollo, 1997 The Hunchback picture image

Richard Harris as Frollo

Traditionally in films versions Frollo is played but an older man. Here is a list of the guys who have played Frollo and their ages when they played the role, (in the 23 and 39 version case I’m counting Jehan as the Frollo and I’m not counting cartoons versions.)

Walter Law (1917) – 41
Annesley Healy (1922) -N/A couldn’t find a birthday year
Brandon Hurst (1923) – 57
Sir Cedric Hardwicke (1939) – 46
Alan Cuny (1956) – 48
Kenneth Haigh (1977) – 46
Derek Jacobi (1982) -44
Richard Harris (1997) -67
Richard Berry (1999 parody) – 50

Jehan Frollo (Sir Cedric Hardwicke) 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Jehan Frollo, Sir Cedric Hardwicke 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Movie Frollos have an estimated average age of 49 with a mean of 46 and a range of 41 to 67. That means, if I remember correctly and Frollo is about 36 years old that is 13 year differences between his book age and the average.

Richard Berry as Frollo 1999 Quasimodo d'El Paris picture image

Richard Berry as Frollo

Hollywood and movie typically cast actors who are older than their roles, I mean Quasimodo is typically played but 40 years old when in the book he says he about 25 year, I should do a post of that someday because that is more irritating.

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture imahe

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

So back to our original question, Can we have a young Frollo? I would say ideally it should be the best actor for the role but that doesn’t always work. Frollo should at the very least read older than the rest of the cast, especially Quasimodo and Esmeralda. So an actor who is at least in his upper twenties through his 40’s is perfect. What is really should come down to is the actor has a hard austere look. Having a Frollo with softer features robs the intensity from the character and if that means casting an actor who is younger so be it. I could forgive a movie that makes a Frollo that has ten year old difference with Quasimodo, as long as they make it clear he is the care giver and he has the right look.

Alan Rickman picture image

Alan Rickman

Benedict Cumberbatch picture image

Benedict Cumberbatch

Charles Dance picture image

Charles Dance

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does this mean I think an actor who is older wouldn’t work for the role? No, I still maintain that Alan Rickman and Charles Dance would make great Frollos, though if they cast Benedict Cumberbatch that would be great too. Should find a  Non-Britsh actor for a recommendation for Frollo, geezes

What do you guys think? Would you be okay with a younger actor playing Frollo? Quite honestly I would just be happy with another film version.

This was too much math for one post, @@.

Book 9, Chapter 4, Earthenware and Crystal

Esmeralda Maureen O'Hara 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Esmeralda Maureen O’Hara 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame

This chapter features a lot more interactions between Esmeralda and Quasimodo. He gives her a caged bird. One important interaction is Quasimodo tries to get Phoebus to come to Notre Dame to see Esmeralda. Poor Quasimodo waits around till 1am as Phoebus is at a pre-wedding party. Phoebus also doesn’t come because he believes Esmeralda to be dead. Quasimodo failing this task cause him to limit his interactions with Esmeralda. He then tries to convince her that his love for her is better than her dreams of Phoebus. He does this by singing to her and with a visual of two vases, one beautiful crystal that is cracked so the flowers are withered and one earthenware which is course and common but it retains the water leaving beautiful flowers. Esmeralda choices the wither flower from the crystal vase. You don’t have to be an English major to get the imaginary of the vase, Phoebus is the Crystal and Quasimodo is the earthenware. After that Quasimodo doesn’t interact with Esmeralda directly which is okay with but he sleeps outside her cell.

This chapter has been done in parts in movies, mainly in the Quasimodo getting Phoebus for Esmeralda. Sometimes he offers to get him like in the book and sometimes Esmeralda makes him go. The caged bird is seen sometimes. He also tries to tell Esmeralda that he loves her but can’t. This chapter also gives use the famous “ Oh, why am I not made of stone, like you.” Which is said to a grotesque image carved on a wall and not a gargoyle. I suppose gargoyles are more dramatic for a movie.

No movie that I know has done the vases. This because it relies on Esmeralda being shallow and naive and the movie versions at this point grow her up where she accepts Quasimodo as at least a friend.

All in all, it’s a good interesting chapter.

Book 9, Chapter 5, The Key to the Porte-Rouge

 

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris

This chapter is Frollo learning that both Esmeralda and Phoebus are alive and thus is torment begins anew. He spends his time locked away and realizes he is jealous of Quasimodo. Then one night he can’t take his lust any more he head over to where Esmeralda is.

This is never done in the movie versions. If Frollo goes to Esmeralda it’s less pre-mediated or we just never see as Frollo isn’t the focus.

 

 

Book 9, Chapter 6, The Key to the Porte-Rouge (continued)

 

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

In this chapter Frollo tires to force himself on Esmeralda. Esmeralda is saved when she find the whistle that Quasimodo left her in chapter 3 of book 9, Deaf. Quasimodo attack Frollo but when he sees it’s Frollo he tells Frollo to kill him with the knife but Esmeralda grabs it first. Frollo isn’t too happy now.

You do sometimes see this scene in the movie, like in 1923, 1956, 1977, and the1982. It seldom ever played out perfect though I think the 1977 version is the closest.

In the realm of Hunchback we know that Quasimodo will (or should) be ugly and deformed and Esmeralda should be pretty, these are truth in in the novel, they have set looks. Frollo, while he does have a set look in the novel and is supposed to have an austere harsh look gets a wide variety of looks in the movies.   So today we’re are going to look at some Frollo’s various hair styles.

Frollo’s hair in the book is balding. he had tuff of ugly gray hair on the side which give him a natural tonsure. Movie never go for this look

Jehan 1923 Hunchback of Notre Dame Brandon Hurst picture image

Jehan 1923 Hunchback of Notre Dame Brandon Hurst

In the 1923 we have two Frollo, Pious Claude and Jerk Jehan. Jehan has black hair that  goes to ears and he also seen wearing a bowler-like hat. Claude has  sepia color. He has a receding hair line.

 

Jehan Frollo (Sir Cedric Hardwicke) 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Jehan Frollo, Sir Cedric Hardwicke 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame

In the 1939 version we again have Pious Claude and Jerk Jehan. Jehan has black hair that is a straight cut across his forehead. He has lock that curl on the side his face. Claude has white hair and he wears a bishop hat.

 

Frollo (Alain Cuny), 1956 The Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo (Alain Cuny), 1956 The Hunchback of Notre Dame

In the 1956 version, Frollo has a full-head of brown hair. He keeps it short.

 

Kenneth Haigh as Frollo 1977 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Kenneth Haigh as Frollo 1977 Hunchback of Notre Dame

In the 1977, Frollo has the brown hair with a straight bang line.

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

In the 1982, Frollo hair at is at it’s most stupid. It’s a blond bowl cut.

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Frollo singing Hellfire Disney Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

In the Disney version, Frollo has the same cut of 1939 Jehan but with gray hair. His bangs cut straight along the center of his forehead and then it recedes.

 

Richard Harris as Frollo, 1997 The Hunchback picture image

Richard Harris as Frollo

In the 1997, he is bald.

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris picture  image

Daniel Lavoie as Frollo Notre Dame de Paris

 

In original Notre Dame de Paris version, he has very short brown hair.

 

Richard Berry as Frollo 1999 Quasimodo d'El Paris picture image

Richard Berry as Frollo 1999 Quasimodo d’el Paris

In the 1999  parody version, Quasimodo d’El Paris, he has short black hair with long thin sideburns.

 

Frollo’s look in the movies (and musicals) are very different than the novel but they seem based Frollo’s look on the past movies than on the novel.

 

 

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

There has been bold Esmeraldas, sexy Esmeraldas, kind Esmeraldas, socially conscious Esmeraldas, mysterious Esmeraldas, vapid Esmeraldas but the 1982 version
of Esmeralda is different, she is the first timid Esmeralda.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

What makes her timid? Well, you know in the book how Esmeralda loves to dance? In this movie she doesn’t like to dance because she is scared of being arrested. An Esmeralda who hates to dance is like the biggest travesty I have seen in a Hunchback version because her love of dance and her free-spirited nature is paramount to her personality and appeal. Even when she does dance it’s half-hearted. Even if otherwise it was a great depiction of Esmeralda is a huge mark against her character and is unforgivable.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Let’s just talk about her looks for a minute. Lesley-Ann Down is very pretty but she is just not right for Esmeralda. Esmeralda is suppose to look exotic to an extent. Down has bright blue eyes and brown-ish hair, though in Hunchback it looked more dark blond. So we have a dark blond-ish blue-eyes Esmeralda. This made the jail scene silly when Frollo mentions her dark eyes which were actually bright blue. Down is more a classic English beauty, she just doesn’t read Gyspy which adds to not believing this depiction of Esmeralda. The film tries to excuse her looks, by Frollo asking if she is in fact a Gypsy and her saying she doesn’t know that is just was they told her.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Down is also a little on the old side to play to Esmeralda as a young girl. To combat this Down speaks softly. This adds to her timidness. This also makes her seem a bit dim however this Esmeralda isn’t as stupid as she seems. While she is attractive to Phoebus and is willing to sleep with him she does back off and try to leave once she finds out that he’s married. Which makes Frollo stabbing him infinitely unnecessary. She also wants Quasimodo to bring Phoebus to her not because she wants to see him but to convince Phoebus to get the charges dropped against her. She also recognizes her love for Gringoire.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture iamge

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

She also develops a bit of a backbone when she rejects Frollo in the jail cell and in Notre Dame, though she pretty much has to rescued both times. She also takes a stand to Gringoire when on their wedding night but that’s in the book. In any case it’s good that she doesn’t always use that timid little voice.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Derek Jacobi as Frollo,  1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Down’s Esmeralda is one of the weaker depictions of Esmeralda. There is not a lot right about her character. Down is not fully to blame, fault lies everywhere; in the writing, in the directing, in the casting and in her acting. Who makes a timid Esmeralda who isn’t free-spirited and dislikes dancing and excepts an audience to buy that character as an good interpretation of Hugo’s heroine? Very little of the original personality of Esmeralda is present in this version except maybe her kindness but that is it. It’s just a weak version of Esmeralda all around and not believable as the character.

Next 1982 Article; Quasimodo

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

The 1982 version is a really good depiction of Frollo but it’s lacking in a few areas of his characters. This is one of the few film versions where Frollo is a priest however he doesn’t practice alchemy at all. Instead he’s a pretty by the book religious sort, spouting God when ever he can. But he starts off well, he adopts Quasimodo as an act of charity and he seems godly and pious which is great counter-point to his downfall later (not much later mind you ^_~ ).

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

However, the way this movie handles his relationship with Esmeralda is weird. First off, Frollo never sees Esmeralda dancing. I’m going to repeat that, Frollo never sees Esmeralda dancing. That is a HUGE oversight. Her free-spirited dancing and radiance is what captured him. Instead he sees her being arrested for dancing and is enchanted. It’s not too far-off but it’s just wrong for both characters. Although I will get more into Esmeralda and her “dancing” when we get to her.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo is also more forceful towards her. When Frollo is a judge this force makes a level of sense but as Priest the approach-avoid conflict should be part of this dynamic with Esmeralda. In this version he lets her off-the-hook for dancing, which is apparently a no-no. And the when she is arrested again she is brought to him for his consent to take her to Bastille (I don’t know why this would happen). However he offers her sanctuary and she goes along with it. He brings her to a room where he makes attempt for sex. She runs off and Quasimodo tries to bring her back. So in the course of a few hours Frollo goes though all the moments that in the books took him months of suffering to reach.

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture imahe

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Also he tries to buy Esmeralda from Gringoire for 40 gold crowns. I’m not sure how much that would be today because to my understanding a crown is an English silver coin. But it probably was a sizable amount. However Frollo offering to buy is quite silly but at least the scene is alluded to again when Gringoire is trying to get Frollo to help him save Esmeralda so I overlook the absurdity of then scene.

 

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Let’s talk about his looks. Derek Jacobi makes a great Frollo but that wig, that wig makes him look like a dork. Jacobi’s Frollo may have the most hair of any Frollo, which considering the character is bald with tuffs of hair isn’t a good thing. It’s just 100% dork salad bowl cut. Also he doesn’t have that angular austere look that Frollo should have.

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

However, despite all that this version tweaks and weirdness, there is jail scene where Frollo bares his soul to her. Is it perfect? No, the scene has its flaws and is not as powerful as the book. But its there and that is more than most of the other versions have.

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

All in all the 82 version of Frollo is commendable. It didn’t get all the facets of his complex character but it tries and does fine job communicating it. I think the credit has to given to Jacobi for his portrayal because he really works to sell this Frollo. So it’s an almost a fantastic  depiction but not quite.

Next 1982 Review Post; Esmeralda

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda,  1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Pretty much the 1982 version follows the 1939 model of how to tell this story. However the 1982 version doesn’t dive into social commentary the same way. The blight of Gypsies is not an issue and Esmeralda doesn’t concern herself social inequality. Esmeralda’s main concerns are not getting arrested, marrying Phoebus and keeping Frollo off of her.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Derek Jacobi as Frollo,  1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Frollo is also different than his 1939 incarnation. For one thing, in the 1982 version he is a priest and has no younger brother. Also he is a little more forward, instead of staring at her he basically tries to get with Esmeralda in the first 20 minutes. He went right to lust. But this version has a decent jail scene so point in its favor. Although I would point out that having Frollo bring Esmeralda into Notre Dame after she gets arrested for dancing and then trying to seduce her robs a bit from the jail scene when Esmeralda asks why he hates her. Esmeralda in the book was scared of Frollo and Frollo’s interaction with her was very limited to no existent. In this movie he is not really acting hateful toward Esmeralda. He acting confused and desperate but he was acting fairly nice toward till he tried touch her and she ran off. So  Esmerald questioning him was tad on the unnecessary side.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire,  1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Gerry Sundquist as Gringoire, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Since the social concerns are not presence in this movie Gringoire has little else to do but moon over Esmeralda, although like in 1939 version he and Esmeralda do fall in love and leave together at the end.

The Death of Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

The Death of Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Speaking of the end, Quasimodo kills Frollo in self- defense by impaling him on a nail. This…..this ……is not cool movie. While I get that the self-defense angle, impaling Frollo on a nail is A) stupid and anti-climactic  and B) having Frollo fall from Notre Dame is a powerful metaphor. My guess the reason why Frollo dies in this manner is the budget but still shame.

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Quasimodo is pretty much the same from 1939 version, Hopkins plays him very sympathetic but it works.

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

David Suchet as Clopin, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Clopin is not fun in this version, He is very conniving. He is not to concern about anything other than survival.

 Robert Powell as Phoebus &Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Robert Powell as Phoebus & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Phoebus is depicted as huge womanizing jerk who is married in this version. Another strange addition to this version is Frollo offering to buy Esmeralda from Gringoire.

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Derek Jacobi as Frollo,  1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda & Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

This version plays the story out pretty conventionally. It doesn’t make too many big annoying changes to the plot. The changes they make are small and mostly the impact the characters.

So let’s dive deeper into those characters, let’s start with the heart and soul of the movie; Frollo

Derek Jacobi as Frollo,  1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

The 1982 version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame was a US made for TV movie. It  was made 4 years after the 1977 version was released the US in 1978. It’s part of the Hallmark Hall of Fame series. It starred Anthony Hopkins and Derek Jacobi as Quasimodo and Frollo. Most of the cast is made up of British actors.

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

Anthony Hopkins as Quasimodo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

Pretty much this movie plays out like the 1939 version but without King Louis and  the modernity angle and the blight the Gypsies in Paris. And it follows the book a bit more than the 1939 version but there a lot differences from.

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

Derek Jacobi as Frollo & Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame

So, is this good version, an adequate version, or terrible awful version? Let’s Jump in, shall we?

Next 1982 Post – Let’s look at that plot

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame, picture image

Lesley-Anne Down as Esmeralda, 1982 Hunchback of Notre Dame